A Fine Rook Endgame, Part 3

I hope you’re ready for some very, very challenging endgame analysis! Today we’ll have what I think is the most difficult and interesting of my four posts on what I call the “Fine endgame”: rook plus 4 pawns versus rook plus 3 pawns, with the stronger side enjoying an outside passed pawn (usually on the […]

A Fine Rook Endgame, Part 2

Last time I introduced a new series of four posts about a very basic (but very difficult) rook and pawn endgame. It’s the endgame where one side (we’ll say White) is a pawn up, and that pawn is an outside passed pawn (we’ll say an a-pawn). As per the “Tarrasch Rule,” the best defensive position […]

Tactical 1.e4: Why is It Perfect for Attacking Players?

Tactical 1.e4: When it comes to building an Opening Repertoire, it is important to consider the player’s strengths and weaknesses. Many people underperform because their openings don’t match their style. It is easy to imagine a strong positional player getting lost in tactical jungles as well as a strong tactician making no sense in a […]

The post Tactical 1.e4: Why is It Perfect for Attacking Players? appeared first on TheChessWorld.

At Last the 1988 Show

Uncategorized

I’m currently writing a history of Richmond Junior Chess Club from 1975 to 2006: you can read the second part here. The next part will cover the period where our members included future GMs Luke McShane and Jonathan Rowson, along with future IMs Richard Bates and Tom Hinks-Edwards. Last Sunday two of these players happened … Continue reading “At Last the 1988 Show”

The post At Last the 1988 Show appeared first on The Chess Improver.

Basman at The British

Michael Basman Editor’s note: What is striking about these games is how each highlights different aspects of Mike’s playing style. As you might expect, there is his calling card – the outlandish opening 1 e4 g5 (‘totally bonkers’ –Nigel Short), but next is an epic…